The eIDAS regulation is officially here

On 1 July 2016, the eIDAS Regulation officially replaces EU 1999/93 Directive for providing governance over electronic identification and trust services for electronic transactions in the internal market across the European Union.

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Trust Service Providers according to eIDAS

 Under Regulation (EU) No 910/2014 (eIDAS), a Trust Service Provider (TSP) is defined as “a natural or a legal person who provides one or more trust services either as a qualified or as a non-qualified trust service provider."

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eIDAS: Driving Business Through Transparency

eIDAS has brought a breath of fresh air to a darker aspect of the technological sector; it’s taken a subject that is sometimes surrounded by a cloud of mystery and confusion (that of security and encryption) and infused it with transparency.

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eIDAS: How Greater Interoperability Enables Business Cooperation

eIDAS will not only usher in a new era of innovation and transparency in how organizations do business, but this regulation is also paving the way for new levels of interoperability amidst agencies, companies, and their partners and clients.

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The eIDAS regulation is coming. How can banks benefit from it?

As of 1st July 2016, the first phase of the EU’s new regulation on electronic identification (eIDAS) will become enforceable. But amid all the confusion about its implications among both EU banking executives and their security experts, Guillaume Forget, Director of Product Management at Cryptomathic explores why banks still have a lot to be excited about.

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ASiC - Associated Signature Containers for eIDAS

 

When an electronic signature is created, it must be associated to the data that it is being used to secure. This is accomplished by creating a data set that will combine the signature with the signed data or by storing the detached signature in a separate resource and then using an external means to associate it back to the data. There are some advantages to using detached signatures; mainly that it prevents modification of the original data objects. However, there is a risk in doing this. There is always the possibility that the signature will become separated from its applicable data, and when this happens, the association is lost.

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Qualified Electronic Signatures for eIDAS

In the world of business, every minute counts. When it comes to closing deals, it is imperative to minimize any delays or barriers to keep business moving at a fast pace. Delays often occur when one party involved in a business or government transaction must wait to receive signed documents from the other party. Mailing documents back and forth by post or sending through facsimile takes time and is not very efficient by today’s standards. And of course, there is the obvious fact that these methods are not very secure.

There is always the risk of the information being sent becoming lost, stolen or tampered with before the intended recipient has received it. This is why now, more than ever, the need for fast and secure electronic transactions has become vital to everyday business processes. The use of qualified electronic signatures answers the call for that need, especially when conducting business across borders.

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Advanced Electronic Signatures for eIDAS

This article describes what advanced electronic signatures are, and what their significance, under the eIDAS regulation, holds for EU member states.

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Will eIDAS spur innovation for your company?


Technology is constantly introducing the business world to new tools, processes, and analytics that transform the way people conduct business. However, many European organizations are holding back from pursuing further innovation because they are concerned about security or regulatory repercussions, in particularly when moving business processes online that require electronic signing.

Can eIDAS bridge the gap and stimulate innovation by providing a predictable regulatory environment that enables secure and seamless electronic interactions between businesses, citizens and public authorities? Or will it rather be just another regulation that hinders innovation?

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